About

166145_100121100063648_6637267_nI am an adjunct research associate in the Graduate School of Law at Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo, Japan. I received my Ph.D. in political science from Rice University, Houston, TX. My primary area of research is the quantitative study of International Relations with focuses on international organizations, international cooperation, and domestic origins of foreign policy changes.

My dissertation, The Effects of Foreign Audiences in International Dispute Settlements, explores the question of why an actor uses international organizations (IOs) to settle disputes when such institutions often do not have enforcement power of their own. I approach this puzzle by looking at domestic and international sources of IO enforcement. I empirically test theoretical implications of my argument with the datasets of trade and foreign investment disputes. Other projects focus on institutional designs and their effects on international cooperation.

I also research the domestic origins of foreign policy changes, focusing on the effects of leadership turnover and the changes in leaders’ societal support bases. I have been working as a research assistant for the NSF grant project: Interests, Institutions, and Foreign Policy Change by Brett Ashley Leeds (Rice University) and Michaela Mattes (University of California, Berkeley).

I completed my MA from Hitotsubashi University, Japan, and The University of Sheffield, the United Kingdom.